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Lion 2019
Chinese New Year has arrived! After a yearlong wait, it is time to celebrate. Take it from generations of those learning how to celebrate, the Chinese are going to whoop it up not just for a day. They don’t celebrate for two days. When the Lunar calendar hits the reset button, it is time to party-on for 3-4 weeks.

Companies in Asian countries plan on shutting down for weeks during this festive time of the year. People plan their budgets and make the long journey to be with family. Together, the bonds of blood draw people together.

They reflect, count their blessings, pour out their savings for the best decorations, delicious meals, loud celebrations, spectacular fireworks, and generous sharing with relatives. It is a picture of the goodness experienced over the year that has gone by and an optimistic look into the future year to come.

This is the year of the Pig. In the legend of the 12 animals representing the lunar calendar, the pig overslept on the day that annual assignments were passed out. The pig arrived last and was assigned the 12th and final year of the lunar cycle. At least he didn’t get volunteered for any dangerous mission.

While the pig may not have the prestige, reputation, or regard as some of the other animals in the West, it is painted in a very positive light. The pig represents prosperity. They have a beautiful personality. Finally, they portray a good and prosperous life. Not a bad portrait at all.

The Chinese have a way of saying something positive about every creature, person, and set of circumstances. If you were born in the Year of the Pig, you have a lot going for you. These years would be 2019, 2017, 1995, 1983, 1971, 1959, 1947 and 1935. Whatever year and under whichever sign, I wish you the Happiest New Year!

photo by BWFong

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IMG_5313No, it is not Chinese.  Yes, it is in Chinese restaurants located in the USA.  No, restaurants in China do not offer these cookies for dessert.

Yet, the iconic fortune cookie makes its way into ethnic lore.  Sometimes it appears in movies.  Iron Man 3 the Mandarin waxes eloquent on the history of this crunchy tasty morsel.

He acknowledges what is generally accepted as true.  The ethnic identity is associated with Chinese.  Yet, few Americans realize that their assumptions bear little influence on the world stage.

The Mandarin reflected, “A true story about fortune cookies. They look Chinese. They sound… Chinese. But they’re actually an American invention. Which is why they’re hollow, full of lies, and leave a bad taste in the mouth.”

This monologue was true.  American ingenuity seems to have been at the forefront of this invention.  Originally, the cookie and fortune seem to have Japanese roots. This cookie announcement many say it all: “originated by the Japanese, exploited by the Chinese, consumed by Americans and entertained by all.”

Regardless of the real history of this conversation piece the fortune cookie is fun.  They offer a tasty end to a delicious meal. Further, they bring most people to a cheerful moment as the evening comes to a close.

Recently, I was out with friends.  We all ate a delicious Chinese restaurant.  The evening was delightful.

Our menu was well-balanced.  Chicken, fish, pork and tofu gave us our protein.  Green string beans, carrots and choy gave us our vegetables.

Flavors from Cantonese style foods were delicious. There was a wonderful blend in each of our plates.  Rice and noodles soaked up those taste bud sensations and satisfied every hungry soul at our table.

Without a second thought or expectation fortune cookies were delivered with the final bill.  We were laughing, joking, reminiscing and doing a lot of talking.  Pictures filled the climax of the meal as well.

Then we passed out the fortune cookies.  I opened mine and announced the delightful revelation.  It simply read, “Hallelujah!”

Our gathering of redeemed souls picked up a special enthusiasm.  Everyone wanted a cookie to explore “God’s will” and we all laughed.  Some of the fortunes were philosophical.  A few were nonsensical.

That special one-word declaration of “Hallelujah!” was unmatched. It was short, fun and true all at the same time.  That after all is what a fortune cookie is all about, eh?

photo credit: brucefong cellphone photography

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